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Home > Images Dated > 2019 > September > 25 Sep 2019

Images Dated 25th September 2019

Choose from 24 pictures in our Images Dated 25th September 2019 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Two-Headed Calf, embalmed. There are many occurrences of multi-headed animals. Survival to adulthood Date: 25-Sep-19 Featured 25 Sep 2019 Image

Two-Headed Calf, embalmed. There are many occurrences of multi-headed animals. Survival to adulthood Date: 25-Sep-19

A tide of microplastics thrown to the beach in the Azores. It is amazing how in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean the sea is already full of these small fragments of plastic trash. Most of the plastic pollution that enters our waterways and ends at the sea came from domestic use - specifically single use disposables, such as straws, cups, lids, take-out containers and plastic cutlery. The real kicker is that plastic does not ever biodegrade in our environment. Instead, it continues to slowly break down into smaller pieces called microplastics, (any piece of plastic smaller than 5 millimetres). Microplastics essentially consist of all forms of plastic - synthetic fibers, fragments of plastic, foam bits and microbeads. This is where wildlife is exposed to the pollution which results in accidental ingestion - commonly mistaken as prey. Making ingestion worse, plastic is comprised of crude oil and carbon-containing compounds referred to as polymers and monomers. The chemical makeup allows it to absorb chemicals found in the natural environment. Then, after it is unknowingly consumed by wildlife, the chemicals leach into the tissue of animals. While plastic itself is classified as non-hazardous, the transfer of chemicals from plastic to animal tissue and then up the food chain can have disastrous effects. With the consumption of seafood, humans are also at risk of ingesting those toxic chemicals as well. Caldeira de Santo Cristo (lagoon), S£o Jorge Island, Azores 2019 A tide of microplastics thrown to the beach in the Azores. It is amazing how in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean the sea is already full of these small fragments of plastic trash. Most of the plastic pollution that enters our waterways and ends at the sea came from domestic use - specifically single use disposables, such as straws, cups, lids, take-out containers and plastic cutlery. The real kicker is that plastic does not ever biodegrade in our environment. Instead, it continues to slowly break down into smaller pieces called microplastics, (any piece of plastic smaller than 5 millimetres). Microplastics essentially consist of all forms of plastic - synthetic fibers, fragments of plastic, foam bits and microbeads. This is where wildlife is exposed to the pollution which results in accidental ingestion - commonly mistaken as prey. Making ingestion worse, plastic is comprised of crude oil and carbon-containing compounds referred to as polymers and monomers. The chemical makeup allows it to absorb chemicals found in the natural environment. Then, after it is unknowingly consumed by wildlife, the chemicals leach into the tissue of animals. While plastic itself is classified as non-hazardous, the transfer of chemicals from plastic to animal tissue and then up the food chain can have disastrous effects. With the consumption of seafood, humans are also at risk of ingesting those toxic chemicals as well. Caldeira de Santo Cristo (lagoon), S£o Jorge Island, Azores 2019

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Eye of Crocodile Flathead - night dive, Paradise Featured 25 Sep 2019 Image

Eye of Crocodile Flathead - night dive, Paradise

Eye of Crocodile Flathead - night dive, Paradise II dive site, Sipadan Water Village House Reef, Mabul Island, near Sipadan Island, Sabah, Malaysia Date

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090919, Actinopterygii, Animal, Aquatic, Asia, Camera, Chordata, Close, Crocodile, Ctm, Dive, Diving, Eye, Fish, Flathead, Malaysia, Marine, Nature, Night, Ocean, Paradise, Pattern, Sabah, Scuba, Sea, Sealife, Sipadan, Southeast, Tropical, Tropics, Underwater, Vertebrate, Wildlife