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Images Dated 2019 November

Choose from 147 pictures in our Images Dated 2019 November collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


European river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis. Mouth detail. Is found in coastal waters around almost Date: 15-Dec-18 Featured November Image

European river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis. Mouth detail. Is found in coastal waters around almost Date: 15-Dec-18

Antarctic butterfish or Bluenose warehou, Hyperoglyphe antarctica. They can grow to 1.4 m in length and over 50 kg in weight. Studies have shown that fish between 62 and 72 cm are mature and range in age between 8-12 years respectively. Mature females can produce between 2 million and 11 million eggs prior to spawning. Remain close to the sea bed during the day and move up in the water column at night, following concentrations of food. They feed on a range of fish, molluscs, squid and crustaceans, they are also cannibalistic. Marketed fresh and frozen; exported to Japan for sashimi; eaten steamed, fried, broiled and baked. From Argentina

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Acanthodraco dewitti. Is a species of Antarctic dragonfish native to the Southern Ocean including th Date: 18-Sep-15 Featured November Image

Acanthodraco dewitti. Is a species of Antarctic dragonfish native to the Southern Ocean including th Date: 18-Sep-15

Blackfin icefish, Chaenocephalus aceratus, swimming close to seabed. Unlike other vertebrates, fish of the Antarctic icefish family (Channichthyidae) do not use haemoglobin to transport oxygen around their bodies; instead, the small amount of oxygen that simply dissolves in blood plasma is utilized. Has totally transparent blood like clear water. It fails to express the major adult ?-globin, ?1, due to the same 5 truncation of the gene, and have lost the ?-globin gene entirely. It is believed they benefit from loss of reliance on haemoglobin-containing erythrocytes for oxygen transport by having less viscous, more easily pumped blood. They compensate for this loss by having lower metabolic rates, larger gills, scaleless skin that can contribute more to gas exchange, wider capillaries and significantly increased blood volume and cardiac output. From Antarctic Peninsula. The ocean temperature in these regions usually remains within a few degrees of the freezing point of seawater, -2 ?C (28 ?F). Consequently, the blackfin icefish is a stenothermal ectotherm, meaning it has a narrow thermal tolerance range and a low upper thermal limit. The Southern Ocean has a high oxygen content, which allows the blackfin icefish to survive without haemoglobin

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Antarctic toothfish, Dissostichus mawsoni. It's the largest midwater fish in the Southern Ocean, it Date: 14-Nov-19 Featured November Image

Antarctic toothfish, Dissostichus mawsoni. It's the largest midwater fish in the Southern Ocean, it Date: 14-Nov-19

Cookiecutter shark, Isistius brasiliensis. Ventral view. The name cookiecutter shark refers to its feeding habit of gouging round plugs, as if cut out with a cookie cutter, out of larger animals. Marks made by cookiecutter sharks have been found on a wide variety of marine mammals and fishes, as well as on submarines, undersea cables, and even human bodies. It also consumes whole smaller prey such as squid. Cookiecutter sharks have adaptations for hovering in the water column and likely rely on stealth and subterfuge to capture more active prey. Its dark collar seems to mimic the silhouette of a small fish, while the rest of its body blends into the downwelling light via its ventral photophores. When a would-be predator approaches the lure, the shark attaches itself using its suctorial lips and specialized pharynx and neatly excises a chunk of flesh using its bandsaw-like set of lower teeth. Atlantic Ocean Cookiecutter shark, Isistius brasiliensis. Ventral view. The name cookiecutter shark refers to its feeding habit of gouging round plugs, as if cut out with a cookie cutter, out of larger animals. Marks made by cookiecutter sharks have been found on a wide variety of marine mammals and fishes, as well as on submarines, undersea cables, and even human bodies. It also consumes whole smaller prey such as squid. Cookiecutter sharks have adaptations for hovering in the water column and likely rely on stealth and subterfuge to capture more active prey. Its dark collar seems to mimic the silhouette of a small fish, while the rest of its body blends into the downwelling light via its ventral photophores. When a would-be predator approaches the lure, the shark attaches itself using its suctorial lips and specialized pharynx and neatly excises a chunk of flesh using its bandsaw-like set of lower teeth. Atlantic Ocean

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